Review: The Republic of Pirates

Title: The Republic of Pirates: being the true and Surprising Story of the Caribeean Priates and the Man Who Brought Them Down Author: Colin Woodard
Pages: 400 Genre: Nonfiction, History
Recommended to: Do you like pirates? You might like this too.
Song: “He’s a Pirate” from “Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl”. By Klaus Bedelt.

51KI-rOAzaL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_The Republic of Pirates answers common questions about pirates, and fills in the gaps on the commencement, reign and eventual demise of the Golden Age of Piracy.

 

Note: This book was legally purchased as an Audible daily deal, and not plundered from the site.

This review keeps getting derailed due to the massively distracting Pirates of the Caribbean movies I’ve got playing in the background. Why can’t jack Sparrow just hop out of the screen and be my friend?

While “Pirates of the Caribbean” has nothing to do with actual historical events, it does draw from actual pirate lore. Pirate history claims such personalities as Blackbeard, Henry Morgan and the Barbarossa brothers. Legends such as these have captured imaginations long after their time. While Captain Jack Sparrow, Davy Jones and Long John Silver are all larger than life characters, their real life counterparts were no less cunning, audacious or frightening.

Had Blackbeard’s personal journal not been lost, we would likely have even more fuel for the fire of pirate culture. But Blackbeard had to come from somewhere. He was a real person with a real past, and it didn’t involve running around as a child with burning hair.

The Republic of Pirates answers common questions about pirates, and fills in the gaps on the commencement, reign and eventual demise of the Golden Age of Piracy.

So, what makes a pirate? According to Woodard, it was a unique blend of social, economic, military and cultural causes. Have you ever tried to make the perfect mixed drink? Just the right amount of every ingredient at the right time with the right blending at the right temperature makes an ideal concoction. This is what happened with pirates.

This is a history book, and not a fictional account. Woodard has actually spent time in the Caribbean and done his research. He balances on the tip of his figurative cutlass the essential history of the late 1600s to early 1700 with the entertainment of pirate stories. After reading this book, not only do I feel more educated and excited about the subject, I actually want to know more!

 

 

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